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Timber beam floors with perpendicular timber floorboards as indicated in the drawing below are common throughout northern Europe. The floorboards are nailed onto the beams and are quite substantial with a thickness of around 25-30 mm. The floorboards are typically connected with one another with longitudinal tongue and groove joints.

I wonder if the floorboards serve a structural function? Specifically, I could imagine that they could serve to distribute loads or to brace the beam structure.

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EDIT:
As pointed out by Solar Mike the floorboards are indeed typically connected with one another with longitudinal tongue and groove joints.

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Most of the wood floors of that type tend to be tongue and groove so they do "interlock" with each other as it helps to prevent squeaking.

They are structural as they need to spread the load and be sufficiently strong so you don't put your foot through when you step on it.

Also the floor needs to support the furniture like chair feet and bed feet as they will not always be located directly above a joist.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the reply. I particularly mean if the floorboards play a structural role for the overall timber beam floor (distribution of loads among beams, bracing), not solely that they have to withstand their intended loads. $\endgroup$ – Steve222 Jun 5 at 10:25
  • $\begingroup$ @Steve222 check paragraph 2. $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Jun 5 at 10:26
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, the boards and beams form and integrated structural diaphragm. $\endgroup$ – Phil Sweet Jul 5 at 18:00

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