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I'm sorry if the question doesn't fit the site but I didn't know where to ask. I found this at a car service where the guys used this thing to correct the painting on the car on the regions where paint flowed down. All I know is that it scratches glass and it weighs 32 grams, dimensions being 3 cm x 2.15 cm approximately.

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  • $\begingroup$ m.imgur.com/a/6a50wKj hey im sorry but i had this imgur link of all dimension but it got remove. Can you figure it out from these pics? Thank you. $\endgroup$ – griffinwish May 21 at 18:21
  • $\begingroup$ Please measure the thickness and calculate its density. Ignore the hole and the rounded corners. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Morton May 21 at 18:26
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, sorry. So I measured it again and its length is 2.5 cm, its height is 3 cm and its width is 3 mm. That gives us a volume of 2.25 cm^3 and a density of 14.22 if my calculations are correct. I hope this helps. $\endgroup$ – griffinwish May 22 at 9:33
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Considering its purpose and the density being in the region of 15 g/cm3, I would say it is the replaceable blade from a carbide scraper, so it is a cemented carbide (something like WC-Co).

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To be honest, this is a very vague question to be able to provide even a remotely close answer but here are my observations. At first i thought it looked like some aluminum alloy but it definitely does not match your weight and volume measurements (assuming a thickness of around 0.5cm). It is at least 3 times heavier than AL but that narrows it down to hundreds of possibilities (only in the metal and alloys family). The simplest way is to ask the guys working at the shop, they might be able to tell you. But if you are really curious about it and wanna go deeper you can try a scientific approach:

a) You could probably assume it is a metal, although there are way too many engineered/composite materials in the market as well b) Use physical data as much as you can (density, hardness for example since you already have these). Use known materials and see which ones it can scratch and which ones can scratch it. c) Check whether it is a magnetic material, there is also a spark test for metals, look it up

But even with this approach you might still end up with dozens of possibilities.

If you really have to know and are willing to invest money in it you can request a PMI or OES test from a local lab, they are readily available and the test takes only seconds to provide a detailed description of the chemical composition of the sample.

Cheers.

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