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I'm working on a design project and I need to know the bending/fluxural strength and the shear strength of some materials so I can determine if my design will fail. However the wikipedia page (for aluminum 6061, for example) only lists the tensile strength. Is there a way to calculate the fluxural and shear strength or are these values in a database somewhere?

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  1. Matweb is a common source of information.
  2. If you have access to CAD software like Solidworks, they usually provide a material database for you to assign to your parts.
  3. If the material is an industry standard, then ANSI/ASTM/SAE will probably have codes/standards where they specify the chemical make-up as well as the minimum mechanical properties for a particular denomination
  4. For woods you can refer to the wood handbook from the USDA
  5. For composites and novel materials you can always look into research papers. Engineers and scientists are frequently testing these materials and they publish their results online.
  6. Materials data book by Cambridge: http://www-mdp.eng.cam.ac.uk/web/library/enginfo/cueddatabooks/materials.pdf

I hope this helps!

Cheers

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ASTM is the source of mechanical properties; ASME usually uses the same . So for seamless pipe an ASTM designation is A 106 ; if ASME ( ANSI used to be the same) accepts it, then identified as SA 106. I never heard of using shear strength or bending strength in selecting a steel , normally tensile ,yield, minimum toughness(usually Charpy) , hardness,and elongation and RA. API writes specs for oilfield materials but I doubt that is what you want. These all all USA specs, but pretty much used around the world although to say so greatly offends a lot of egos.

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You can use the online tool MakeitFrom and for special purposes check the bibliography at the final of the page, you also can compare two materials. The materials listed on the page are standardized with ASME, ANSI and ISO properties. Then you can use a tool like Fusion360 to check if properties, in simulation, can work on environments that you require.

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