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Sorry for such a basic question, but it is a safety concern that brings me here:

We have a hook installed on the ceiling. From it a rope chair (examples) hangs.

Assuming good form and no wild swinging, will doing pull-ups on this hook place a greater stress on it than me sitting on the rope chair?

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  • $\begingroup$ worry more about the hook ripping out from the ceiling than the hook itself breaking. $\endgroup$ – morbo Apr 1 '20 at 20:28
  • $\begingroup$ @morbo that is what I was worrying about $\endgroup$ – lara michaels Apr 3 '20 at 19:44
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I would expect the max stress to be slightly higher when sitting in the chair because of the fact that some people tend to plop down into them. Doing pull ups will create a lot more cycles of near max load.

Note that wood, if that is what it is connected to, has the unusual ability to better resist shorter term loads. An impact load, with a very short duration, doubles it! Even snow loads, that last much longer but are not there all the time, increase the ability to carry the load by 25%.

I doubt that you have much to worry about, assuming that the hook was appropriately sized and attached for the chair.

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When you sit down you are lowering yourself slowly and also your butt muscles (gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus) which are strong and big cushion and break your impact so one could assume roughly you momentarily impart 1.2-1.5 times your weight.

But depending on how fast you swing down from your pull up if you are not experienced to control your descent you could easily Apply 2 times your weight at the bottom deadlock point when falling to a dead stop. and the fingers muscles are not too fat to add any padding.

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