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enter image description hereEverything i've tried so far is probably wrong. I tried using 40 as the traverse angle and 30 as the azmuth angle to find the cosine of the euler angles, and then multiplied all three by the force's magnitude to seperate the force. How would you solve a problem like this step by step? How do you seperate the force into components and what do you do to them?

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  • $\begingroup$ Figure out what the forces from F are along each axis (x, y, z) and the moments about A from each axial component. Equivalent magnitude forces and moments are acting on A but in opposite directions to maintain a static location. $\endgroup$ – jko Feb 26 '20 at 13:10
  • $\begingroup$ Is what I did with the tranverse angle and azmuth angle the way to figure out what the forces from F are along each axis? Do if find the moment vector by finding the cross product between the force's components and the distance vector to point A? $\endgroup$ – Albert Goldman Feb 26 '20 at 13:50
  • $\begingroup$ Yes. Use the Pythagorean theorem for a 3D triangle to verify your numbers. $\endgroup$ – jko Feb 26 '20 at 17:58
  • $\begingroup$ @jko Looks like you could convert these comments into an answer. $\endgroup$ – Wasabi Feb 27 '20 at 23:50
  • $\begingroup$ @Wasabi if I were more confident in my answer, yes lol $\endgroup$ – jko Feb 28 '20 at 19:44
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Using 40 as the traverse angle and 30 as the azmuth angle to find the cosine of the euler angles, and then multiplied all three by the force's magnitude to seperate the force. The find the cross product of the r distance vector to a (.55i + .4j -.2j), to find the moment vector at a. The force has the same magnitude in each component, but also opposite signs.

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