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I am curious how taking the most basic display such as this OLED one that works with the ardunio is driven: enter image description here enter image description here

i.e. We are using just a clock and data line to drive a 128x64 pixel display. The pixels containing the OLEDs with TFTs are arranged in a cross-hatch design, but what is the link between them? There are probably shift-registers to cut down on the number of pins, correct? Any guidance is helpful, thanks.

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  • $\begingroup$ What does its data sheet say? Or the Arduino? $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Feb 23 '20 at 7:46
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Pretty much every display is multiplexed. Typically each column is turned on (pulled to positive supply, for example) in turn and the rows for the pixels to be turned on in that column are switched to the opposite polarity (pulled to negative supply in this example). Usually the sequence happens at high speed so that there is no noticeable flicker.

For very small displays the rows and columns can be driven by the microcontroller. For larger displays this would require too many pins on the controller so the data to be displayed is somehow shifted in serially and shift-registers and latches hold the data within the display. This can have an advantage for displays that change relatively infrequently because the microcontroller can send the data to the display and then forget about it while it gets on with more important stuff. Meanwhile the display can continuously refresh based on the last data it received.

We are using just a clock and data line to drive a 128 × 64 pixel display.

The simplest implementation of this display would require 128 + 64 pins to drive it. Obviously this is not possible on an Arduino.

The pixels containing the OLEDs with TFTs are arranged in a cross-hatch design, but what is the link between them? There are probably shift-registers to cut down on the number of pins, correct?

Correct.

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