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I am an engineering student. I want to get into microscopy research and bio-science. So I want to buy a fair enough compound microscope. I searched for them and there are so many variants from different manufacturers. So, I couldn't select one.

My budget is $1000. I know that sounds way too overkill for entry level, but just say that this is total amount I have to spend for a good microscope. I am currently in India and associated price for variants of major manufacturer is not mentioned here so if anyone can mention price(as in India), would be appreciated.

Which manufacturer and which variant should you recommend specifically?

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  • $\begingroup$ This question might be a better fit for SE Biology. $\endgroup$
    – Fred
    Feb 1 '20 at 5:36
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You are going to need to try these for yourself and your application. For example: If you will be mostly using 50 X to 100 X , you don't need an oil immersion lens. For inexpensive scopes I liked Unitron . But a quick look on the net shows some things have changed since I used them ; Also, my experience was inverted stage/metallurgy. I recommend a binocular. A good light is essential. Don't get more magnification than you need ; a fuzzy 1000X is not as useful as a sharp 100X . I have no clue about the India market or prices, But Nikon , Canons and Olympus were excellent . Many other excellent names like Zeiss , Reichert and Wilde. A used brand name is better than a new unknown maker , in my opinion . Today I expect a video display is very common ,however I am not familiar with them. You will need to look on the net or in a library and learn about things like "exit pupil". Good luck.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the tips but I am still unsure. Many Indian manufacturers called me, but I want some reliable global manufacturer, well known by its quality. I also need some expandable scope for future upgradations. Am I going the right way or should I buy from Indian manufacturers? $\endgroup$
    – K_lash96
    Feb 1 '20 at 10:32
  • $\begingroup$ I never encountered a microscope made in India. And, all microscopes I used were made 35 or more years ago. $\endgroup$ Feb 1 '20 at 15:58
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    $\begingroup$ Don't be impressed by a high magnification number. Take your own specimen and observe it in candidate microscopes. $\endgroup$ Feb 1 '20 at 16:03
  • $\begingroup$ I am going against Indian manufacturers because of quality issues. So then which global manufacturer do you suggest? Nikon, Leica or olympus? btw Olympus microscopes are more readily available in India then other manufacturers. $\endgroup$
    – K_lash96
    Feb 2 '20 at 14:20
  • $\begingroup$ Olympus looks more practical with better availability. $\endgroup$ Feb 3 '20 at 20:53
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Olympus scopes are well-known for their excellent optics. Used examples are plentiful and modest in cost. They are easily customized with things like binocular eyepieces, mechanized stages, and camera output ports and both their eyepieces and objective lenses are available in a variety of magnification powers. They are also available as metallographic or confocal microscopes which operate on reflected light instead of transmitted light; these saw wide use as wafer inspection microscopes in wafer fabs in the US.

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  • $\begingroup$ Okay, I am going to Olympus hq India whenever this pandemic stops. Till then I have no where to get my microscope. Thanks for the suggestion anyway. $\endgroup$
    – K_lash96
    Jul 5 '20 at 2:29

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