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could there ever be a structure that would require something like this?

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    $\begingroup$ Yes. (They will not have been built just for fun!) $\endgroup$ – Jonathan R Swift Jan 2 '20 at 7:35
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    $\begingroup$ Sorry boss, I cross-threaded it ! $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Jan 2 '20 at 8:26
  • $\begingroup$ @SolarMike could you pass me that 96 15/16 wrench out of the tool box? $\endgroup$ – George Clooney In a Mooney Jan 2 '20 at 9:23
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    $\begingroup$ it's a pity these props don't have real helical threads, people who spend all day looking at bolts will wind up in the uncanny valley. $\endgroup$ – Jasen Jan 5 '20 at 5:00
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From my location it appears the image is broken, however I can assume with my imagination and the comments it’s a pretty big bolt.

Exceptionally large bolts are surprisingly not that uncommon. They often show up in oil industry to bolt flanges and for use in huge structures. But they are usually custom low production bolts designed for a specific use case and not mass manufactured. M180 is the largest I’ve ever seen in a bolt list to purchase from a supplier.

24” nuts was “common” for a time, however this has mostly changed to higher quality smaller diametre alloys and bolts.

At one point there were 98” diametre, and nearly 30’ long bolts made in the 60s

Penrith Engineering Works in Clydesdale Scotland in 1967. The bolts measured 27' 4" long each and had a diameter of 4' 2".

As far as i remember it was an experiment to bolt oil tankers together that failed miserably.

As mentioned in the oil industry it is common to use large diametre bolts, as much as 20” (w510) can be “easily” purchased from ITH for example.

There are of course large problems with large bolts (fitting, yes?) handling, manufacturing, weight, transportation, actually bolting them, etc etc And often when the design requires such large bolts then one will generally choose a different (permanent) connection method.

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  • $\begingroup$ This bolt is bigger than you’re imagining - the nut is almost as tall as as an adult male. Looks architectural to me, rather than oil industry, but there’s not much context. $\endgroup$ – Jonathan R Swift Jan 3 '20 at 10:10
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    $\begingroup$ It could just as easily be theatre scenery, though... OP never specified where he found the image $\endgroup$ – Jonathan R Swift Jan 3 '20 at 10:12
  • $\begingroup$ @JonathanRSwift I found the image on a social media site, it was being made for a family owned hardware shop I believe. So I was just wondering if a bolt this big actually exists within a structure. $\endgroup$ – George Clooney In a Mooney Jan 4 '20 at 6:52
  • $\begingroup$ So you think it's a model for outside the shop? $\endgroup$ – Jonathan R Swift Jan 4 '20 at 8:33
  • $\begingroup$ There's two, they're dull grey in colour (primer grey) about 1.2m diameter and over 6m long. I'm guessing they were cut from foam using some sort of big lathe. one of the bolts is supported using a gantry crane, the crane remote is in shot and the straps are visible too, but could be mistaken for architectural features $\endgroup$ – Jasen Jan 5 '20 at 4:49
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A company called Metalcraft Engineering Company Ltd made them out of 5mm steel plate for a another company that sell nuts and bolts.

made by https://www.facebook.com/metalcraftengineering/photos/a.454442584764550/1263076980567769/

For these guys https://www.facebook.com/theconnectgroupnz/photos/2743380862386863

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