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A fan

Here is my fan in my office. Sometimes I used it if my air conditioner (AC) has problems, or I my self have problems with my health due to the freon. What I observed is that the heat (or probably temperature) will be reduced if I turn on the fan (I mean, there will be wind blow there) even if the room is remain segregated from outside (no air interchanged with outside).

Then my question, what is the explanation for heat reduction due to wind blowing?

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Nope.

The temperature will rise. The reasons are:

a. You will be burning your food and breath which will tend to increase the temperature.

b. The electric energy not 100% converted to create magnetic flux in the coil. Instead, some of the electric energy is converted into heat by the coil.

c. The fan blades are transferring their mechanical energy (pressure and kinetic energy) to the air to move around you. This motion of air will be taken to rest at some distance from the fan. While air is going to rest it loses the kinetic energy, converting it to heat by means of friction.

By all means, the room temperature only increases!

But why do you feel cold? The airflow on your skin carries away the heat from your skin continuously (sweat is evaporated and this phase change draws heat from your skin).

This is the reason you feel chilliness when air flows around you.

If you switch off the fan then, you won't feel this chilliness but, you will feel warmness suddenly.

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    $\begingroup$ The airflow on your skin carries away the heat from your skin continuously (sweat is evaporated and this phase change draws heat from your skin). This is the reason you feel chillness when flow around you. Seem this is make sense. $\endgroup$ – AirCraft Lover Dec 26 '19 at 7:07
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    $\begingroup$ @AirCraftLover then you should upvote or even accept the answer. $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Dec 26 '19 at 8:49
  • $\begingroup$ Yes @SolarMike, sorry for the missed. I accepted it. Thanks have reminded me. $\endgroup$ – AirCraft Lover Dec 26 '19 at 9:17
  • $\begingroup$ Also forced convection? $\endgroup$ – Eric S Dec 26 '19 at 14:56
  • $\begingroup$ I did research to this. I used a small fan/blower, 220V/0.14A or 30.8VAC at night when I was slept. I slept from midnight to 6 AM. I put it blowing facing underneath my bed, not directly facing me as it will make me get sick. I found the result, my room is colder than without that blower/fan. Without fan, it will be hot enough just 1 or two hour later. So my conclusion is, there is another physic need to be explained. And regretfully, your answer I have to un-accept to avoid mislead. $\endgroup$ – AirCraft Lover Apr 2 '20 at 3:20

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