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I have an "DaVinci IQ" portable vaporizer. Since the battery quickly runs out of power, I often keep it lying next to me, plugging from the computer into its USB-to-Mini-USB (or maybe it's Micro-USB -- unsure about that detail), often beyond the point where all the five LEDs are lit, indicating that it's fully charged.

I don't know where I heard this, but growing up with "early" rechargeable batteries, it was always a "thing" that you were supposed to stop charging them as quickly as possible after they are fully charged, or else "bad things" supposedly happen. I don't know what exactly those bad things were, but I'm pretty sure this was true at some point.

The question is: is it still true? Should I unplug it ASAP once it's fully charged, or does it no longer make any difference whatsoever?

And, if the answer is that this still has to be done, why is this? Why can't the device "stop sending in electrons" once it's fully charged, since it clearly can detect that?

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AHh the battery problems of devices and the plug in myths.

So to get past this on the get go, modern electronics using fancy chemistries monitor the voltages of the batteries being charged. Once they are charged to their ideal values, the electronics turn off the charging entirely, or drastically reduce it. (trickling is often not in use either, ofc this depends on battery chemistry) Without these electronics you'll get a thermal runaway and they will burn/blow up as see in the link

So as long as the internal monitoring of any electronics is working fine, then you really don't have anything to work about. If they for some reason don't, then you can have problems very quickly. I leave my laptop plugged in almost exclusively and it's battery is fine. (it's a macbook, so I couldn't take the battery out anyways). As I am sure lots (most) of people leave things plugged in for 'too long' and I haven't heard of any exploding batteries in the news lately.

Regardless, however for safe practice, it's probably a 'best practice' to remove them when you can. Batteries are on borrowed time regardless, eventually they die and need to be replaced, it seems yours are the case.

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