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In my thesis, I deal with heating circuits, where several heat generators are present, e.g. a combined heat and power unit and a supporting boiler. Usually, the boiler is placed in front of the heat storage tank, but I have also repeatedly seen heating circuits where the boiler is placed behind the heat storage tank.

For example, the structure of the heating circuit of an IEEE paper:

enter image description here

What are the advantages and disadvantages?

Do I understand correctly that if the boiler is in front of the heat storage tank, the water of the heat storage tank is heated and if it is behind it, it has its own reservoir of water which it heats?

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In the diagram shown, then if the water temperature of the storage tank falls below the set value, the aux boiler comes in to augment the water temperature.

Other possibilities include the use of a diverter valve so when the tank water temperature is too low, the valve changes to demand water heated by the boiler, if that boiler has a rapid response then direct, if not then it may well have a storage tank of its own.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you very much for your answer. One more question about the first possibility: if the water temperature of the storage tank falls below the set value and the prime mover is off, are there ways to prevent the tank from cooling down to ambient temperature? $\endgroup$ – MerklT Dec 3 '19 at 14:16
  • $\begingroup$ "Everything tends to the same temperature over time", so no, but insulation will extend the time the water stays hot... $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Dec 3 '19 at 14:25
  • $\begingroup$ Okay, thanks. One more question if the boiler fills the storage tank in addition to the Primer mover, i.e. is placed in front of it: would a typical boiler then clock in such a way that the water temperature remains at the lower storage limit, or would it charge the storage tank up to the upper storage limit? $\endgroup$ – MerklT Dec 4 '19 at 7:18

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