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A fluidic muscle is a pneumatic or hydraulic actuator, consisting of a flexible tube. When the tube is filled with a working fluid (pressurized air or hydraulic oil), it balloons out and shortens. In some applications, fluidic muscles are superior to pistons.

In theory, you could imagine the same principle in reverse as a pump: Water flows into the tube under gravity, ballooning it out. The tube is then pulled apart, reducing its volume and ejecting the water. Check valves ensure proper water flow. Tbh, I don't see any advantage over other diaphragm pumps, but I could be wrong of course.

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    $\begingroup$ Isn't this how you spit out a mouth full of water? Archerfish too. $\endgroup$ – DKNguyen Aug 10 at 2:35
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Every time you exhale, your ribs do a similar thing. They pull your rib cage in and down, making it a bit longer and narrower, pressuring the of air out of your lungs. And then they relax and let the fresh air in.

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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure this is entirely true - as I singer I was always taught that it's primarily your diaphragm pushing upwards on your lungs from the bottom that squeezes the air out - rib cage expansion has a minor effect compared to diaphragm movement. $\endgroup$ – Jonathan R Swift Oct 15 '19 at 12:33
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If you could come up with an application for it, surely it could be used as a pump. But it wouldn't be terribly efficient, because you need to power a linear actuator to make it work, probably via a hydraulic pump, when you could have just used a pump and motor to start. And if you did have a cheap/free source of reciprocating energy, you would also need to beat the efficiency and cost of the hundred of years old hand well pump (piston with flap), diaphram pump, or simple reciprocating piston pump (which typically uses check valves). The efficiency of returned energy after deformation is probably not as good as just acting on the fluid directly.

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