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**Part 1 of the example **

Part 2 of the example. Can someone explain how can we find |Z| term and also from where does the cosine term arrive at the final equation.

Can someone explain how can we find |Z| term and also from where does the cosine term arrive at the final equation.

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    $\begingroup$ What don't you understand? $\endgroup$ – user8055 Sep 10 '19 at 18:44
  • $\begingroup$ I can't get why |Z| is producing the result as provided in the text. I was expecting it to produce sqrt((wL)^2 + R^2) . Also why does the cosine term arrive at the final equation of v(t)? @user8055 $\endgroup$ – ursamajor99 Sep 10 '19 at 18:51
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$\underline Z$ is, by definition, $\frac{\underline V}{\underline I}$. So $\underline Z$ is not shown, but it comes from the calculation for $\underline V$ as a function of $\underline I$.

The magnitude and phase angle is computed from $\underline Z$, and are basic complex number calculations.

The cosine term in the final equation comes from the definition of $i(t)$ at the top of the example, which is in terms of $\cos \omega$.

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