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So, I am working with FBG sensors and I have read that those sensors need to be re-calibrated every 10 years to get accurate measurements. But no where on the internet (AFAIK) is it explained why every 10 years it has to be re-calibrated and why.

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  • $\begingroup$ Is it a manufacturer recommendation? Have you contacted them? $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Aug 31 '19 at 13:27
  • $\begingroup$ Mechanical loading and thermal cycling may cause the material to creep and therefore change the grating line separation. $\endgroup$
    – alephzero
    Aug 31 '19 at 13:33
  • $\begingroup$ For Solar Mike. The sensors are glued on the road of steel in an bridge structure $\endgroup$
    – LinkCoder
    Aug 31 '19 at 16:57
  • $\begingroup$ @LinkCoder did you contact the manufacturer, glued or not? $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Sep 1 '19 at 7:56
  • $\begingroup$ @ Solar Mike ... Not ! just i would like to know what the reasons to re calibration .. the answer of alephzero was ok.. more information .. let me know .. thanks! $\endgroup$
    – LinkCoder
    Sep 1 '19 at 13:38
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Fiber Bragg Grating sensors can reflect a particular wavelength of a light beam or a selection of wavelength in a fiber optic by having the sensors fiber refractive index grated according to specifications to reflect the particular wavelength.

They are used for many applications in fiber optics such as add drop multiplexing and precision measurement of heat and stress.

Because the are precision tools each manufacturer has its own criteria of calibration and set up.

Here is a link to a good educational YouTube video.

You can click on the more link on the bottom of the video and read the physics involved and applications.

Fiber Bragg Grating link.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, that was no answer ! $\endgroup$
    – LinkCoder
    Sep 1 '19 at 11:50

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