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I need to build special equipment for a microwave oven ( 2.45 (GHz)). But even glass and plastics do heat up in microwave ovens. Where can I find a list of the materials that are the most transparent to this frequency ?

Thanks

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    $\begingroup$ Have you tried borosilicate glass (not normal glass)? How do you account for secondary heating effects? $\endgroup$
    – joojaa
    Commented Jun 22, 2019 at 10:23
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    $\begingroup$ Could you give us more information about how you are using the material in your design so we can narrow down the possibilities for you ? There are many materials which have a suitable dielectric loss factor that you can use. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 22, 2019 at 21:35
  • $\begingroup$ I am building a vacuum microwave dehydrator. When the food is nearly dry, the glass bowl containing the food (and plastic fittings) heat up a lot defeating the purpose of dehydrating under vacuum/low temp. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 23, 2019 at 11:19
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    $\begingroup$ You can use Teflon, although not cheap , it has a dielectric loss rating of .0002 @ 3GHZ, will not absorb moisture , and has little or no chemical reaction with any food. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 24, 2019 at 17:44
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    $\begingroup$ @ManudeHanoi: You can Google the electrical characteristics of just about any material. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 25, 2019 at 17:33

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Selecting a material with a low dielectric constant (Relative permittivity) will be the most transparent. Specifically, you need to select one that is low for the use temperature and for the use frequency of 2.5GHz. This level of information is not easy to come by, but there are some online tables that will give ballpark dielectric constants. Looks like polypropylene is a common consumer material for use in microwave ovens.

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