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The work done by a turbocharger increases the inlet charge without much of a burden to the exhaust flow. This increases the amount of air (and fuel) that flows into the engine. How does this affect work done for a given amount of fuel consumed?

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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of Does the turbo-compressor increase the efficiency of car engine? $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Jun 9 '19 at 23:43
  • $\begingroup$ Before asking my question, I had read the referenced post, and hesitated to do so for that reason. However, after reading it and previously many related discussions on other sites, I felt that the question should be asked and categorized differently, which would yield more data. $\endgroup$ Jun 11 '19 at 6:43
  • $\begingroup$ Any thermodynamics textbook will show how this is calculated... I still use Rogers & Mayhew... $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Jun 11 '19 at 6:45
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It's complicated and depends on application and demands such as emissions restrictions and required throttle response, but generally, figure on about a 2 percentile improvement with a turbo. An example would be going from 34% to 36% thermal efficiency by adding a turbo.

You can see this for yourself if you look at the BSFC fuel maps of a family of engines that include turbo and normally aspirated versions.

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Yes, turbocharging improves both the volumetric and thermal efficiency.

But as most drivers tend to use the power that does not always translate to an improved fuel consumption.

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