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Does a car starter motor use a starting resistor to limit the high starting current? What is the type of connection between field coil and armature? Series, parallel or mixed?

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  • $\begingroup$ @GlenH7 why did you not convert that incorrect answer (due to the poster not having enough rep to post a comment) into a comment? $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike May 15 '19 at 13:03
  • $\begingroup$ @Fred why did you not convert that incorrect answer (due to the poster not having enough rep to post a comment) into a comment? $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike May 15 '19 at 13:04
  • $\begingroup$ A re-post of the comment I gave to a subsequent question by the OP Newer designs of motor are around 200 to 500 A but older ones or the larger ones for the bigger engines 3 litres required some 600 to 800A or so and some trucks exceeded 1000A. This also meant that some starter cables were quite large - a source of copper for those who would steal it. and that happened often... $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike May 15 '19 at 13:04
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Having stripped and rebuilt many starter motors from those on lawn mowers to those for 10 litre diesels - there were no extra resistors fitted except, of course, the resistance of the field coils or armature windings themselves. Not ignoring the resistance of the cables and internal resistance of the battery though.

They are series or parallel connected depending on application. Designed for maximum power at low speed to get the stationary engine rotating.

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  • $\begingroup$ See ballast resistor $\endgroup$ – Ray Butterworth May 15 '19 at 1:25
  • $\begingroup$ Ballast resistor were mostly found on the ignition coils when they used 9V coils in running mode and supplied them with 12V during starting ie by-passing the resistor. A very common failure point... Soon designed out. A ceramic block 2 or 3 inches by one wide and 4 terminals as theyhad 2 resistors in parallel. $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike May 15 '19 at 4:46

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