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As I understand from reading about air conditioners is that the way they work is that air sucked in from the room is passed by the cold evaporator pipes and then the air is released again.

My question is how does the air sucked in from the room change temperature so quickly since it passes very quickly by the cold evaporator pipes and released again?

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The air gets cold because the cold evaporator is designed to have a large surace area and be good at transferring energy from the air to the refrigerant quickly.

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The cold refrigerant is circulated into winding tubes passing through two partitions with hundreds of tightly spaced thin vanes to absorb the heat of the air coming from the room very quickly.

The numerous blades create Maxim contact for the warm room air.

Then, after the room air has given much of its heat to the evaporative coil it gets recycled back to the room.

Optimally the temperature of the air returning to the room should be around 5-degrees Celsius.

In the phote the insulated copper line brings the cold refrigerant from the condenser and cycles is through the thin aluminum pipes. The Evaporative coil is installed in the air-conditioning ducting in a position that all the room air is pumped through it.

evaparaative coil.

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  • $\begingroup$ That optimum temperature of 5 deg C is that for a specific application or all applications? $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike May 10 '19 at 6:39
  • $\begingroup$ @Solar Mike, I used to do comprehensive home inspection as a buyer's agent many years ago. And my tool bag had a thermometer among other things that was marked at 5 degrees as check mark for register outlet. $\endgroup$ – kamran May 10 '19 at 17:00
  • $\begingroup$ just seem to remember that different refrigerants have different temperatures for evaporation and condensing... $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike May 10 '19 at 17:07
  • $\begingroup$ I agree. Not talking about the coil, I am talking about air flowing out of the register. Some $\endgroup$ – kamran May 10 '19 at 17:13

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