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Support structures like lattice supports, tree supports or wire supports are being widely used in metal printing or FDM as they minimise the wastage of material and power consumption. In addition, they are easy to remove. But compared to volume support, are these structures stable enough to stand firm against the build tray during the printing process? How these structures avoid buckling depending on the height of supported zones?

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It is a fast evolving industry. I have been looking into some printers and it seems at the present time the limit of the size is 30cm cube roughly, but it is changing every day.

Many of the shapes don't even need support, some printers can bridge spans of up to 25mm. Vertical angles less than 45degree don't need support.

There are new ways of printing that don't need any support at all, such as laser printing, however some those are not publicly available. All hardware manufacturers have manuals and recommend what to do as for support and filler. considering the fact that filaments get cold and hard fast after printing, the structural strength of support is not of primary concern. Also digital model makers are trying to design the model with least need for lattice or any support and make it easy to release the support with least post processing. Here is an article about the methods and manufacturers of both software and hardware.

3d metal fuse deposition modeling

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