0
$\begingroup$

In a conventional nuclear reactor the amount of neutrons 'flying around' is maintained with control rods and water is usually used as a moderator. From a certain point of view the control rods keep the nuclear fuel just critical enough.

In a molten salt reactor where the fuel is dissolved in the salt irrelevant of this is thorium, plutonium or uranium. And in a reactor where the nuclear fuel is solved into the salt :

How is it possible to maintain the mass critical enough in a molten salt reactor?

I can understand that they use control rods in the reactor itself, but if the salt is dropped into the safety reservoir below the reactor isn't the mass getting uncontrolled supercritical?

Thanks!

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

If the fuel concentration drops you can extract the salt from the solution as well perhaps using a chemical reaction that converts one of the components of the salt to gas or solid.

That safety reservoir isn't going to be a single big hollow tank. Instead it's going to be several smaller tanks lined with neutron absorbent material and designed to quench the reaction as fast as feasible.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.