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Hello all I'm designing a joint that needs a bearing to fit central but I'm wondering whether I have to protrude a bit on both parts so there will be some gaps between the bearing and the parts which allowing both components rotate freely.

I don't know how to describe this exactly or accurately so I attached some pictures for explanation The first picture is without protruding the second one is with protrude and the final picture is the location where I want to put the bearing(represented as red rectangle)

So if I am right how much should I protrude? The bearing is 6mm outer diameter 3mm inner hole.

Thank you very much enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ The "protrude" is called a "shoulder". $\endgroup$ – user1318499 Mar 17 '19 at 3:00
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Companies such as W.M. Berg make shaft spacers specifically for this purpose:

Snippet from W.M. Berg catalog page

For a 3mm ID bearing, Berg provides two thicknesses: 0.1mm and 0.15mm.

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It depends on the type of bearing (and the direction of force). But generally I would build the part with a little bit of spacing so that the bearing is no dragging on the housing. If you are using a taper roller bearing for example, you might not need the spacing because the housing might already have a "spacer".

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The upper part should protrude a little bit so that it isn't in contact with anything but the bearing face. This will introduce risk of debris which you should take into account if the item will be in an unclean environment (but only if the bearing is under great dynamic load).

If the "arm" is in contact with the "cylinder" (that houses the bearing), it seems to me like that would defeat the function of the bearing. Thus the protrusion should only be in contact with the inner circle of the bearing, so as to not collide with the outer that should only be in contact with the cylinder.

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