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Answer briefly how the object-oriented methodology transforms an information system.


I really do not know how to answer that question. I know what is an information system ("System capable of collecting, storing, processing and distributing information in time and form for decision making within an organization") and also what is object-oriented methodology ("discipline related to programming") but I do not know how the latter models the first one.

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    $\begingroup$ You might find this page insightful Open letter to students with homework problems $\endgroup$ – Nick Alexeev Dec 10 '18 at 6:14
  • $\begingroup$ @NickAlexeev are you saying that this question is unrelated to this site? $\endgroup$ – manooooh Dec 10 '18 at 6:17
  • $\begingroup$ I'm saying that this question will probably not fly anywhere on StackExchange. Except some chat rooms, maybe. $\endgroup$ – Nick Alexeev Dec 10 '18 at 6:24
  • $\begingroup$ I don't think the question quoted, in bold, is actually written very well - it needs work... $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Dec 10 '18 at 7:42
  • $\begingroup$ Closing as "unclear." The community is willing to help with homework problems, but is not here to do your homework for you. $\endgroup$ – user16 Dec 10 '18 at 12:58
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Object-oriented methodology allows representing the system as a hierarchical structure of self-contained subsystems and entities comprising it. This allows separate development and testing of the subsystems apart from each other, good code reuse (through inheritance - similar objects; and through use of object libraries - use of pre-made objects by 3rd parties) and abstracting internals of subsystems apart from the systems using them, creating consistent interfaces between them, easy to extend, debug and modify.

For an easy analogy: You build the big system out of big bricks, each of which you build of smaller bricks, and these - of yet smaller, each with own quirks and special purposes, some being just special variants of others, others being pre-packaged ready-to-use bigger bricks. They all need to fit just right, but if you make a small brick of the tiny bricks and it fits just right with the bigger brick, you can just reuse it everywhere it's needed (and if it's faulty, you can pinpoint the fault and fix it easily.) If you started building the entire system out of the tiniest bricks from start, you'd end up with a mess where every segment, no matter how common, needs to be made from scratch all over again, and if something's broken, you don't follow the simple chain big brick; smaller brick within it, even smaller within, the bad tiny one - you'd need to track all the hundreds of tiny bricks from top to the faulty one through that mess.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, I like the example!! Could you explain a little more the phrase "(...) and abstracting internals of subsystems apart from the systems using them" please? I do not know what the word "internal" means in this context. $\endgroup$ – manooooh Dec 10 '18 at 19:24
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    $\begingroup$ @manooooh: In computer lingo, these are called 'private methods and properties' (of an object/class), as opposed to 'public'. There's "What can be done using this brick" and "how does that brick manage to achieve that". The user is not interested in the latter, using the whole thing as a tool - and the creator only exposes to the user (declares as public) parts that the user needs - and keeps these relatively unchanged, while retaining freedom to optimize, modify or expand the inner workings - without breaking the user's code.*abstraction layer* of the public interface $\endgroup$ – SF. Dec 10 '18 at 23:00
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    $\begingroup$ @manooooh: So - say, the system needs to communicate with some other system. So there's a class 'connection'. You create an instance - an object, which takes parameters of what system it's to connect with, and exposes methods .send() and .receive(). And so you as as writer of the system and user of the 'connection' object only pass data back and forth with the other systems through these two, without any worry in the world what magic of encoding, locating, correcting transmission errors, and so forth the 'connector' does under the hood to get the data there and back. $\endgroup$ – SF. Dec 10 '18 at 23:04

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