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I have read about a device called drumometer, which measures the number of strokes of hitting drum stick.

I think this is almost the same, but instead, I would like to measure the number of strokes/impacts made when I shake a very small object inside a very small container.

To give an example, imagine a cube where one face is removed, hence making a hole. Then, I put the end (say X) of a stick inside that cube and hold the other end (say Y) from outside. I then start vibrating (I mean like stirring movement) the stick so that the X end hits all faces of the cube. Then I want to measure how many times the X end of that stick hits not necessarily all faces but at least one face (since I will shake it randomly anyway).

The cube could be as small as 1 cm^3 (it might not even be a cube, just something with a hole that small where a stick can be put inside and shook from outside), and the stick is just long enough for me to hold it and small enough to get through the hole.

Thus, in relation with that drumometer, it kinda looks like an even smaller "drumometer" is needed. What do you think?

I don't have good background in measurement, only have some elementary freshmen undergraduate physics background instead. This is gonna be very helpful in my experiment once I know how to measure the number of strokes. *feel free to edit my tags if not related

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Piezoelectric thin film sensors can be made as small as you want (well maybe not Planck length) :-)

All you have to do is pre-amp the signal from the sensor and send the output to a scope to see the waveform caused by the impact, or any other recording device you want.

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Record the sound made from the impact, zoom into and analyze the sound wave to determine what an impact "looks like", count the impacts.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. I guees this can be called indirect measurement? May I know what kind of device can I use to do this? $\endgroup$ – bms Oct 27 '18 at 16:48
  • $\begingroup$ It should sound a bit continuous so I guess I need even more accurate device, but this I believe is worth a try.. $\endgroup$ – bms Oct 27 '18 at 16:49

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