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enter image description here

My electrician made a cut in the wall and the beam as in the image in my absence. The cutting is done with hammer and chisel and it is around 1.5inch deep..I'm really worried that it might impact the structural strength.

Beam appears to be larger than 9inch by 9inch.

Is it safe to do it? If it is not, what could be done to fix this?

Thanks a lot!

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    $\begingroup$ Dimensions of the beam? If it is a 10 by 12 or a 3 by 3 there is a big difference... $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike May 20 '18 at 13:16
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the reply, it appears to be larger than 9in by 9inch.. $\endgroup$ – user2523796 May 20 '18 at 13:20
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    $\begingroup$ @user2523796 Please clarify: are you saying that's a longitudinal cut along the entirety of the RC beam? If so, are you sure that's an RC beam? A 1.5-inch deep cut into a beam's section would probably reach the stirrups and I can't see any evidence of stirrups in that picture (nor that they've been cut, which would be very concerning). $\endgroup$ – Wasabi May 20 '18 at 13:34
  • $\begingroup$ It is cut around 1.5in deep into the beam section and the stirrups are visible, but they haven't been cut. (they are hidden behind the pvc pipe in the picture) $\endgroup$ – user2523796 May 20 '18 at 13:39
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    $\begingroup$ I am unclear what exactly has been done. A more zoomed out photo showing the whole beam would be useful. I have no idea if this channel has been chased out near the top of the beam, near the bottom, or half way up. I think I can see masonry to the right of the photo - are you sure this is a reinforced concrete beam and not a masonry wall? $\endgroup$ – AndyT May 21 '18 at 8:15
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I am not yet a qualified civil engineer which means this is not certifiable as correct.

It seems the cut is in the end of the beam which rests on a load bearing wall. Since punching shear is at 45° the cut is likely outside the critical zone.

If that beam extends towards the camera and the hole is through the maximum critical shear point there may be structural issues to think about. I would put a thick steel pipe through and ensure it is sealed in the beam properly with good grade cement before putting the electrical cables back through.

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If the beam is not at a critical position, you can move the conduit lower out of the way and patch the damaged area with a 28" long steel, L 4"x 4" x 3/8" running on the corner of the beam and saddling the exposed area.

This L needs to bee attached with 1/4" x 4" long concrete anchors at 6" O.C. on both sides of the L to the beam, total of 8 anchor bolts. The bolts should be placed at 1" near to the edge of L.

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    $\begingroup$ Unclear (to me) what your proposed fix is - it may need a picture. Even more unclear is why you think this repair is sufficient - there are no calculations presented to justify it. $\endgroup$ – AndyT May 21 '18 at 8:12
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    $\begingroup$ That - 2 was unwarranted considering the person is an experienced and qualified professional engineer who worked in this field for a very long time... $\endgroup$ – Rhodie Aug 19 '19 at 19:54

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