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I have been recommended not to run the two-wheeler (Suzuki Access) at a constant speed (I give a constant throttle in a way that I run essentially at a constant speed of about 40-45 kmph). In fact, I have been told to keep changing the acceleration (smoothly though) for lesser fuel consumption. I want to understand the technical reason behind this claim.

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  • $\begingroup$ (1) What is a Suzuki Access? Is it a petrol engined motor bike? (2) Your post seems to mix up speed and acceleration. Can you edit your post to clarify exactly what you are asking? $\endgroup$ – Transistor May 19 '18 at 12:39
  • $\begingroup$ I think he's more likely mixing up 'acceleration' and 'the position of the accelerator (throttle)'? $\endgroup$ – Jonathan R Swift May 19 '18 at 20:57
  • $\begingroup$ @Transistor Suzuki Access is a scooter running on petrol $\endgroup$ – user16060 May 20 '18 at 7:03
  • $\begingroup$ @JonathanRSwift Thanks for pointing out. I realize that 'the position of the accelerator (throttle)' makes more sense than writing 'acceleration'. $\endgroup$ – user16060 May 20 '18 at 7:04
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Your question doesn't make much sense.

  • For a given set of conditions - selected gear, gradient, load, wind and road resistance - there is a required power to maintain constant speed.
  • Since power is a function of throttle position and this increases with throttle rotation then there must be only one throttle position that generates that power.

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The graph and topic is discussed further in https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/57888/why-does-higher-acceleration-minimize-a-cars-fuel-consumption.

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The optimum speed for obtaining maximum efficiency varies is not a constant with the load. That might be the reason for the advice.

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