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I am learning about gears, hobs and things of this sort. The main book is the machinist handbook which does a pretty good job of explaining things but things are in imperial scale.

This causes me a lot of confusion, especially when dealing with gear cutting blades where imperial uses DP and metrics uses Modules.

Are there any recommended books as thorough as the machinist handbook about gears but one that uses metric system instead?

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  • $\begingroup$ Both my sons are doing a tool maker's apprenticeship and are developing skills to use both systems... The precision is the same independent of the measuring scale - unless we talk about the tunnel under the channel... But then there are some constructions where the same units were used and they still missed... $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Feb 9 '18 at 15:03
  • $\begingroup$ Why do you care? I don't know what "DP" or "MOdules" are in this context, but there's zero difference in approach, materials choices, etc. simply because you define a gear tooth-height as 0.1 inch, 2.54 mm, or 1.262624e-5 furlongs $\endgroup$ Feb 9 '18 at 15:06
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    $\begingroup$ DP and Module work in opposite directions. Bigger Module = Bigger Tooth, Bigger DP = Smaller Tooth. It's quite legitimate to find this confusing, and to want a reference material based on metric measurements, if OP will be primarily involved with metric gears. $\endgroup$ Feb 9 '18 at 15:14
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    $\begingroup$ If you want to learn about gears I'd recommend learning how to discuss things in terms of both DP and module. I worked for a gear specialist and which nomenclature a person/customer/expert use was random, we used both despite the vast majority of work being based in the UK or in Europe. DP is very common (tooling and gear profiles are regularly defined by DP) and honestly it's more intuitive despite using inches. It's not hard to convert, just a factor of 25.4. Most senior guys talk in 'pitch' i.e. DP, regardless of country. $\endgroup$
    – Petrichor
    Feb 9 '18 at 16:15
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There is an English translation of "Tabellenbuch Metall", which is the german equivalent. This uses metric DIN standards. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mechanical-Trades-Handbook-Ulrich-Fischer/dp/3808519134

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