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While I’m studying about a fired heater (furnace) in chemical engineering , I learnt that the process fluids enters from the convection section and leaves at the radiant section of the furnace.

Why is this the case ?

How is this linked to the temperature of the hot flue gas rising up? The temperature of the hot flue gas is lower in the convection section. So how does it link to why the process fluid is entering from the convection section and not radiant section ? Thanks.

enter image description here

The picture shows the process fluid entering from the convection section and leaves at the radiant section. So to clarify, my question is asking why does it enter from the convection section and not the radiant section. ?

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  • $\begingroup$ I think you need to provide a labelled and annotated diagram to explain this. $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Jan 15 '18 at 11:40
  • $\begingroup$ @SolarMike alright $\endgroup$ – user175089 Jan 15 '18 at 11:44
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It is just getting as much heat as possible.

Heat flows from hot to cold. The convection section is a much lower temperature. The convection section is basically waste heat in flue gas. The cold process fluid is (pre) heated to recover some of the waste heat.

The exit process fluid may be hotter than the flue gas.

In any heat exchanger you should save the hottest heat for last.

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  • 2
    $\begingroup$ this is referred to as a "counterflow" design. it is very common in heat exchangers of all types. $\endgroup$ – niels nielsen Jan 15 '18 at 22:04

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