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From my understanding, the more surface area the flow passes, the more drag happens due to skin friction.

An example of this is the new Ford GT, which has a converging cockpit and separated side body panels. I did some research and the answer I found is related to decreasing the frontal area of the vehicle, but when I compare it with the increase of the surface area it's almost double the area of similar cars.the new ford gt convergent cockpit and separated taillight panels

Image source: ford.com

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  • $\begingroup$ be aware the ford gt is a rear (mid) engine design. The design is in large part driven by getting air to the engine. There is also a style aspect of course. $\endgroup$ – agentp Jan 8 '18 at 23:19
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I think those tunnels are there to reduce the amount of flow separation drag occurring at the blunted end of the body, while still maintaining the "fastback" roof line of the original car.

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  • $\begingroup$ And to control the airflow towards the rear wing / spoiler - mindyou would be interesting to see how effective it is - wind tunnel results etc $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Jan 8 '18 at 8:28
  • $\begingroup$ indeed. and experiments like that are always big fun. $\endgroup$ – niels nielsen Jan 8 '18 at 18:28
  • $\begingroup$ Especially the supersonic tunnel... $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Jan 8 '18 at 18:33

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