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In order to conduct a study, I need to place a rectangular plate freely placed (1 cm by 2cm) inside water and control it from outside (better wireless). I need to give oscillatory motion with specific frequency/amplitude. At present I used LEGO Next servo motors and I could not achieve it successfully due to mechanical instability and methods to control freq and amp. Also the gear assemblies used affected the results. May I ask people here to suggest a way to produce vibration motion of this plate with minimal interfering mechanical set up? I can choose any kind of plate (plastic or metal) I can employ magnetic or electric methods to produce vibration. any direction way forward will be appreciated.

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  • $\begingroup$ Mount the plate ona tod and have the rod driven by a rotating cam... $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Dec 6 '17 at 4:07
  • $\begingroup$ What is your specific frequency/amplitude? Can you use a solenoid? $\endgroup$ – Jonathan R Swift Dec 6 '17 at 10:48
  • $\begingroup$ I am expecting a frequency of 1 Hz to 10 Hz with amplitude of 1 to 5 cm $\endgroup$ – shiva Dec 7 '17 at 5:30
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get a loudspeaker and glue a tiny push rod to the center of the cone and to the plate. Then send an AC signal at the frequency of choice into the speaker. This will work for frequencies below the fundamental free-air resonance of the cone, for a 12" speaker this is usually about 1 to 2 kHz. for frequencies higher than that (up to 5kHz) you can use the driver unit off of a high-power horn type tweeter.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice idea I will give a try, could you please suggest what kind of signal source I can use. Is it possible to produce vibration wirelessly or without pursh rod? $\endgroup$ – shiva Dec 7 '17 at 5:31
  • $\begingroup$ you would use an audio amplifier with an output rating of 10 to 20 watts, bigger than this is OK, smaller probably would not work well. you would drive the amp with an audio signal generator plugged into one of the inputs marked "AUX". it may be possible to omit the push rod but most loudspeakers are not waterproof! $\endgroup$ – niels nielsen Dec 7 '17 at 18:41
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for your information. I think with this i will be able to build what i want...so I am marking it as answer. $\endgroup$ – shiva Dec 8 '17 at 7:50
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Professor Wiciak has done some similar researches using piezoelements to induce vibrations.

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