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I am looking for some material which is resistant to higher temperatures (around 1000 degrees Celsius). So far, I found this:

  • Gypsum plaster board
  • Perlite board
  • Calcium silicate board
  • Sodium silicate board.

Which of this is mostly resistant to damage? Or is there any high temperature resistant material which has good mechanical properties (especially resistant to damage done on edges of boards)?

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  • $\begingroup$ What were the tiles used on the space shuttle made of?? $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Nov 23 '17 at 15:27
  • $\begingroup$ 1000 degrees F or C ? $\endgroup$ – agentp Nov 23 '17 at 19:08
  • $\begingroup$ It is 1000 degrees C $\endgroup$ – blackarrow Nov 23 '17 at 19:13
  • $\begingroup$ Ceramics. look at materials used for kiln fixturing $\endgroup$ – agentp Nov 23 '17 at 21:56
  • $\begingroup$ I think that would be too brittle. The above materials I mentioned because they are not that brittle and have lower weight compared to ceramics or glass. $\endgroup$ – blackarrow Nov 24 '17 at 8:15
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Without knowing the application it would be difficult to provide you with a correct answer.

Super alloys might be what you are looking for, materials usually used for stuff like jet engines are made to retain their mechanical properties at high temperatures.

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1000 C is pretty hot. You need steel making and treating materials. One of the few solids that is not heavy is magnesium oxide.It won't tolerate much mechanical abuse. Otherwise the only options are various types of fire brick and castables which I think of as pretty dense . Of the things you mentioned only cal-sil has a chance .

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  • $\begingroup$ Look up Harbison Walker . It looks like John Mansville did not survive the asbestos hysteria, but they might have some refractory products. $\endgroup$ – blacksmith37 Nov 24 '17 at 22:42
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Depending on the degree of damage resistance, whether you want the temperature to be sacrificial or not and the duration of the applied temperature then something like Fendolite might be an option.

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