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I am currently working on a prototype wire winch. I encountered some difficulties when trying to join the shaft and the cable drum. Indeed the joint must be a welding, so I presume no keys are needed.

However since I'm not used to welding, I'm just wondering what type of welding would be the best for a Shaft/Drum connection.

I also suppose that welding type would be a "Tee weld" or am I wrong?

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  • $\begingroup$ I would use glue if the components are wood. $\endgroup$ – blacksmith37 Nov 12 '17 at 3:15
  • $\begingroup$ Why do you need welding? Most winches I've seen are bolted together. $\endgroup$ – vidarlo Nov 12 '17 at 9:44
  • $\begingroup$ @Derkooh are you sure the OP is talking about the drum to cable connection and not the shaft to drum connection? $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Nov 12 '17 at 9:49
  • $\begingroup$ @SolarMike You are correct. I misunderstood. $\endgroup$ – Derkooh Nov 12 '17 at 14:22
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It is possible to consider a female spline in the drum and a splined shaft : this would make for easy replacement in case of failure and may help the assembly process.

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    $\begingroup$ I'm also thinking about dropping the Welding joint for a Spline coupling About the Welding , yes It would make life hard in case of a Failure as I will probably have to change the whole Winch $\endgroup$ – Elyes GS Nov 12 '17 at 11:56
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There are several issues to consider here :

  • it is pretty unusual to weld assemblies directly to the output shaft of a motor as is significantly complicates assembly and maintenance.
  • Shafts are often plated and/or high strength steels which may require special preparation and treatment for welding.
  • In some cases you want to isolate the motor from vibrations, shock loading and bending from the load, especially in the case of something like a winch.
  • Welding almost inevitably introduces some distortion to a joint so you generally want to avoid welding parts where alignment is critical unless you have some other means of adjusting afterwards or are prepared to construct a very rigid jig.
  • There is quite a lot of potential for damaging the motor by heat, stray current or sparks/spatter.

Also in many cases it if preferable for the load on the winch to be carried by its own set of bearings as the motor bearings may not be designed for those sorts of radial and bending forces.

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