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Can you please suggest what kind (type) of hinge / pins I should use to make the mechanism in the attached file. I was considering to use the pins shown in the second image. But I am not sure if it will work.

enter image description here

enter image description here

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closed as too broad by Wasabi, Fred, wwarriner, Jem Eripol, Donald Gibson Nov 9 '17 at 18:05

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ it would depend on many things such as materals , load , how many cycles do you need it to last, etc, etc. $\endgroup$ – agentp Nov 3 '17 at 17:20
  • $\begingroup$ correct. I will keep that in mind. But what kind of pin / hinge is shown in the red circle (in the above image)? What is it called? $\endgroup$ – Rutvij Kotecha Nov 3 '17 at 18:31
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What is shown in the picture is what people usually refer to as a pin connection. There are multiple ways you can design a pin connection as suggested in the comments above and there is no one right design for it. Disregarding practical considerations, such as materials, load cycles and etc, and in pure design engineering terms, you will need to find the shear strength of the items you have selected for your pin, and make sure it is reasonably stronger than what you have calculated for the shear load on the pin based on the configuration you have. The shear load on the pin can be determined from the normal force at the pin connection, and ut can be something less if you have double shear or triple shear mechanisms in your pin connection in question.

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