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As I understand from theory that two integrators are required to provide zero velocity lag in a type 2 servo system. My question is how does 2 integerators help to nullify velocity errors. Less of maths with intuitive explanation will be useful

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Integrators is just a fancy way of saying you want to check your results. A type 0 system simply does not check the result at all. A type 1 system is reading the position directly from the shaft for example. So if there would be any unknown load etc in the system then you could compensate for this position error.

Whatabout a type 2 system? Well since you can measure the position you can deduce what the position should be If you were moving at speed x. This system is supprise supprise an integrator, integrating velocity gives position. So a type 2 system just calculates where the position ought to be if velocity is what you think it should be versus where it is. It can then compensate for this error.

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  • $\begingroup$ Not very clear. Velocity to the first integrator gives out position. Now the position is again integrated. How can the 2nd integrator give velocity output $\endgroup$
    – Vishnu
    Oct 28 '17 at 9:30
  • $\begingroup$ No velocity lag results in zero output from error detector. There are two integrators in the system. The first integrator must generate constant dc output (for a zero error) followed by the second integrator, which will convert it to a ramp to match the input velocity. But how does it all work? How can an Integrator generate a DC output for a zero error? $\endgroup$
    – Vishnu
    Oct 28 '17 at 9:49
  • $\begingroup$ @Vishnu it doesent not in any real system, it provides a reference so that i can adjust the system so it has no error. most likely any real system does not work on analog voltage. $\endgroup$
    – joojaa
    Oct 28 '17 at 11:18
  • $\begingroup$ In addition there is several ways it can work. You would integrate the ramp then you have a position or type 1 problem $\endgroup$
    – joojaa
    Oct 28 '17 at 11:29
  • $\begingroup$ My question is purely theoretical. A ramp integrated twice results in an output which has power of 3, not a ramp $\endgroup$
    – Vishnu
    Oct 28 '17 at 13:12

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