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I have a question for all experienced in manufacturing of steel products;

Is it possible, and or workable to resistance spot weld dissimilar metal thicknesses together? for example, 1.5-2mm thick steel to 3mm thick steel.

And please elaborate on the limits... such as the minimum thickness to the maximum thickness that is able to be welded reliably and quickly in a manufacturing environment.

Thanks in advance for your help :).

Thomas

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Yes, but it may be necessary to pre-heat the thicker part - this depends on the relative thickness differences as well. You should set the current setting for the thinner of the two parts - otherwise excessive damage to that part may result.

More detail here : https://www.longevity-inc.com/resources/articles/welding_thick_to_thin_parts

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  • $\begingroup$ I think the method of pre-heating thicker parts is used in conventional welding techniques. Such as MIG or stick welding. Not RSW. Thank you for your reply. $\endgroup$ – Thomas W. B. Oct 11 '17 at 22:47
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I never heard of preheating for spot welding. For greater metal thickness , the technique of "Projection" welding is used. A type of spot weld where one component has a small raised area where the weld will occur. I think it is unnecessary for the thicknesses you have.

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  • $\begingroup$ Preheat, used for other types of welding, is not applicable to spot welding because of the quench by conduction. That is, cooling is so fast , to make a difference you would need to heat to above the Ms ( martensite start) temperature ; about 700F + for "mild" steel. $\endgroup$ – blacksmith37 Oct 11 '17 at 19:48
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your Reply. I had never previously heard of Projection welding. It is not suitable for this application because it is a press type machine rather than a handheld one but is a solution if the metal thicknesses vary too much. Thanks for your answer. $\endgroup$ – Thomas W. B. Oct 11 '17 at 22:57

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