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Yes, the one where you put lighter close to nozzle of deodorant, light it up and start to spray out the deodorant. I suppose that this is simillar to how gas stoves work, so it shouldn't explode. Even when I stop pushing on spray button, flame gets closer to deodorant and it feels like its your last moment, flame can't get back into the can and cause a fireshow, becasue there's no air in the can. Worst thing that can happen is nozzle meltig down over time and flame getting bigger but not out of control. Right?

Also, when things can go bad? I know that i shouldn't throw deodorant can into flame, but can it overheat just from being used as a flamethrower and boom?

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    $\begingroup$ Things can go bad when 1) your flame touches something flammable, 2) you get poisoned by fumes from burnt chemicals that comprise whatever the deodorant contained, 3) you spray a lot of gas without lighting it first, then apply flame or spark, and it all explodes. Also, burnt nozzle may turn the normal dispersed cloud of flame into a squirt of flaming liquid. $\endgroup$ – SF. Jul 11 '17 at 10:39
  • $\begingroup$ It's one of those situations where you never want to say "never". Nothing is 100% certain. $\endgroup$ – Fred Jul 11 '17 at 11:55
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    $\begingroup$ You planning on auditioning for "Jackass" ? $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Jul 11 '17 at 14:04
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No, the flame can't go upstream back into the can and explode what is in the can. This is no different than the flame in your gas stove can't go back up the pipe and explode the whole distribution network.

Fire is a chemical reaction between fuel and oxygen. There can't be fire in the nozzle or in the can because there is no oxygen there.

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    $\begingroup$ [Citation needed] You dead certain there's no O2 in the can? But that's beside the point. The stuff in the can will "explode" for all practical purposes if the can is heated significantly and any kind of leak is created at the nozzle area. The remaining combustibles are ejected at rather high rate, oxidizing the moment they leave the can. Hilarity ensues. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Jul 11 '17 at 14:07
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    $\begingroup$ This answer is lazy and inexpert and will get you killed. $\endgroup$ – Air Jul 11 '17 at 16:01
  • $\begingroup$ And BTW there are "fires" generated via non-oxidation processes. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Jul 11 '17 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ @Carl: Then it's not a fire. Fire is a oxidation process, usually envolving atmospheric oxygen here on Earth. You can stretch it to include other oxidizing agents, but anything further than that isn't a "fire" anymore. Of course there are other highly exothermic reactions that can cause damage and hurt you, so not being a "fire" doesn't make it safe. $\endgroup$ – Olin Lathrop Jul 11 '17 at 19:33
  • $\begingroup$ @Air: Not really sure what you're objecting to. I'm not saying the practice of lighting the output of spray cans on fire isn't a bad idea or isn't dangerous. I was only answering the part of the question specifically about whether the flame can go upstream into the nozzle and the can. The answer to that is still clearly "no". $\endgroup$ – Olin Lathrop Jul 11 '17 at 19:36

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