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When creating a detention pond I have only came across examples where the pond is created by digging. Is it possible that a pond is created by creating retaining walls / embankments? and if it is can you please provide examples.

Please note! this is a detention pond not decorative pond.

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  • $\begingroup$ Do a search for "how to build a raised pond" gives lots of examples using wood sleepers, bricks etc $\endgroup$ – Solar Mike Jun 22 '17 at 22:37
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, there are tons of ponds created by forming a wall, aka dam, at the outlet end of a depression. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Jun 23 '17 at 11:55
  • $\begingroup$ It's not seen as often as digging because problems of rheology make it less practical - freshly laid dirt won't be as packed and as waterproof, so extra steps (and materials) are required to waterproof it sufficiently. In case of a dug pond you just dig a hole, fill it with water and it's done. $\endgroup$ – SF. Jan 31 '20 at 8:59
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It is possible to construct a dam without digging a hole to form the dam, but earth must be brought in from elsewhere to create bund walls that will enclose the dam. In the past, the inside of the dam used to be lined with clay, to provide a leak proof seal. These days a polymer lining is placed in the smaller turkey's nest dams before filling it with water. Such dams are usually constructed on flat terrain and tend to be filled via a pipe or hose, generally attached to a pump.

From page 11 of Design of Earthen Tanks:

The turkey's nest tank is similar to the ring tank. But the material for the bund construction is brought from the outer side of the bund. The level inside the tank is same as that out side.

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In my experience you should always dig when creating detention ponds. This allows you to position it at the best location available to you incase water levels run high.

For this purpose, you may want to build the banks up higher than you actually intend them to go, and then leave a gap where you plan for any excess water to escape. You'll need to create a path leading away from the pond toward a creek, stream or river. You'll also need the local government's permission to do so before you introduce a new tributary to the local water table.

Depending on how big the pond is I would also recommend a very good PVC liner or if ita a bigger detention pond some kind of tank liners will do the trick.

I found a really good guide here also: https://www.hunker.com/13424245/how-to-create-a-retention-pond-for-water-runoff

good luck with your project

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  • $\begingroup$ I thought the purpose of these ponds was to arrest 50% run-off from the site and allow the precipitate to percolate into the ground rather than dissipate into riverine system. Basically, they are flood prevention devices. $\endgroup$ – Rhodie Jan 31 '20 at 10:12
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Yes, you can build a detention pond in fill slope. It isn't recommended but can be hard to avoid in some cases. For example if the pond must fit at the edge of a site where there is a slope away from the development. In that case you should have as much of the pond in cut area as you can. Also closely consider soil drainage properties and consider a liner of some kind and anti-seep collars to prevent failure due to infiltration in the embankment. Local regulations may also have a say in this design.

See this design guide for help.

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