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On a lawn mower there is a non-removeable metal shaft on which a pulley stack sits. The problem is that worn out bushings caused the shaft to wear in two places and this is causing the drive belt for the blades to be out of alignment and thus throw the belts. My question is, how can I engineer a solution to either shim up or machine the shaft on the deck when turning it on a lathe is not an option?

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    $\begingroup$ Why can't it be removed from the deck - usually riveted but they can be drilled out. $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    May 24, 2017 at 7:32
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    $\begingroup$ This is an XY Problem. Your problem isn't how to machine an unremovable shaft. Your problem is not realizing that if it can be attached by man, it can be detached by man. Remove it, repair it or build a new one, replace it. If you can't figure out how to remove it, post pictures. $\endgroup$
    – TimWescott
    Aug 13, 2019 at 15:52
  • $\begingroup$ Is turning it on a lathe is not an option because you don't have access to a lathe? Are replacement parts available from the lawn mower manufacturer? $\endgroup$ Aug 2, 2021 at 16:57

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This could be done several ways that cost more than a new deck would.

The best solution I can think of would be to grind off the existing shaft, if it was pressed in you can grind / press out the remaining shaft then weld across the hole (not easy but possible). Then grind the weld flat and drill a new hole. To make it easier you could weld on a .25" or .125" plate instead of filling in and re-drilling the hole.

I would probably use a bolted shaft instead of a pressed in one so you can replace it in the future; a good shoulder bolt may work.

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  • $\begingroup$ those shafts handle a lot of vibration. if you take gwydionforge's advice and replace the worn shaft with a shoulder bolt, be certain to assemble it with nuts containing locking inserts and put locktite on the threads. $\endgroup$ Dec 20, 2017 at 20:42

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