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Currently I am powering a worm to drive a worm gear that is pinned together on the same shaft to a spur gear to drive another spur gear.

I would like to simplify the process.

Is there a way to power a worm that drives a worm gear to mesh with another worm gear as spur gears mesh together?

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In answer to the "I want to simplify the process" part of the Q...

Reversing the cut of the worm would allow the final gear to turn in the correct direction without reversing the input shaft direction and would save one spur gear at least. Perhaps the second spur is needed, perhaps not, the Question isn't clear on that.

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As far as I know, no. Worm gears can only mesh with worms. Worm gears cannot mesh with other worm gears. There may very well be a way to simplify your process, but I don't think the idea you suggested is feasible.

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  • $\begingroup$ That also depends on the load - torque, RPM, total work life, and allowed play. For "lightweight" work there's no reason you can't use the same gear as worm gear and spur gear. It will be inferior in the role, both suffering worse wear, able to transfer lower torques and creating more play, but if it's, say, a rarely used configuration sub-assembly (say, one you set at the start of a production batch, or for service access) and the play is acceptable, you're OK. $\endgroup$ – SF. Jun 19 '17 at 9:12
  • $\begingroup$ @SF., technically you are correct. You physically could force a worm gear to mesh with certain spur gears. But the reduction in capability would be significant, I would guess orders of magnitude (i.e. a gear that might normally last for 10,000 hours would probably be chewed up after 100 hours of operation). For a home hobby project that does not have to last a long time, it could be okay. But nothing beyond that. $\endgroup$ – Daniel K Jun 20 '17 at 21:20
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    $\begingroup$ or for application where you expect a minute of operation per day - like a regulation/service mechanism. $\endgroup$ – SF. Jun 20 '17 at 22:20

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