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A gauge pressure sensor measures a pressure at a port against ambient pressure.
A unidirectional differential pressure sensor measures a pressure at a "high" port against a "low" port.

Is a gauge pressure sensor the same thing as a unidirectional differential pressure sensor (simply using ambient pressure as the "low" side)? Is this just a matter of where your reference point is?

I'm guessing you could turn a differential sensor into a gauge sensor by using ambient as your "low" side. Can you turn a gauge sensor into a differential sensor by using a pressure port rather than ambient?

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A differential pressure sensor can be used as a gauge pressure sensor by leaving the low pressure port open to the atmosphere.

A gauge pressure sensor is unlikely to be effective as a differential pressure sensor. The atmospheric side of the sensor has no need to be air tight, so if you did connect it to a low pressure point, it would probably leak air in or out, causing an error in the reading.

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Differential sensors are essentially gauge sensors with a low side port (gauge sensors usually do not have a port where you can connect a tube).

If you connect the low side port of a differential pressure sensor to ambient pressure, you will essentially have a gauge sensor.

A useful application of this case is when you want to connect your gauge sensor to ambient pressure but in your system there is no ambient pressure reference in the immediate environment.

Therefore, you have to use a tube and connect the low side port at an ambient pressure reference further away.

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