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(I posted this in the Sound-Design section but got advised to post here instead).

I just purchased a 3d printer and I am working on a product with a box that has a hole in the bottom and the top. Inside this box I have a few electronics that has a pretty loud sound. What I now look to do is to kill that sound as much as possible so it is not possible to hear it as loud.

At home I have a few acoustic panels looking like this and as they are very lightweight it seems like a very good solution for this design: EQ Acoustics Classic Wedge 30 Tile grey

If I cover the interior of the box on all the walls would this make the sound not leave the box as much which would result in a lower sound? I am very novice when it comes to this area so any help/tips is very appreciated!

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Width and length is around 30cm.

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Acoustic tiles reduce reflected sound. They are not so good at reducing sound penetrative. And their design requires a large structure, so it won't work shrunk down to 30cm. This is down to the frequency of sound, and the speed of sound. You could use the principles to reduce ultrasonic emissions, or very high pitch sounds. To reduce lower pitch emissions, you need to focus on what's causing the noise in the first place. Perhaps start with the noisiest component and explore how you can change it.

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  • $\begingroup$ The sound is like a propeller so I think that classes as a high pitch sound. Would the acoustic panels help with that? $\endgroup$
    – Martman
    Mar 29 '17 at 11:38
  • $\begingroup$ It's probably a mixture - but I honestly don't think panels would help. If something is vibrating, try changing it's chapel or weight. This will change it's resonant frequency which if you're lucky will cancel some sounds out. If there is a propeller, you could try a different type of fan. Centrifugal fans tend to be quieter. Also, some designs are better than others. Fans can also be made more quiet using more aerodynamic struts, blades etc and better bearings. Good design is everything. (Prevent noise in the first place; prevention is better than cure) $\endgroup$
    – CL22
    Mar 29 '17 at 14:29
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks a lot for your answer. I ended up researching a bit more and find this thread: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/142995/… where they talk about active noise control: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Active_noise_control $\endgroup$
    – Martman
    Mar 29 '17 at 18:44
  • $\begingroup$ Since it is a 3D printer, the sound is probably from the stepper motors. You might try sorbothane (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorbothane) which absorbs sound really well. $\endgroup$
    – Eric S
    Mar 29 '17 at 19:29
  • $\begingroup$ Hi! :) No it is not a 3d printer. I just use a 3d printer to print the model. It is a box with electronics with a high pitch sound (sounds like a propeller sound). $\endgroup$
    – Martman
    Mar 29 '17 at 19:52
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If you can remove or reduce the openings you will have the most success in reducing sound. Failing that, if you need airflow, baffles will help to reduce the sound (at a cost of reducing the airflow). Once you've addressed the design of the holes, adding mass will be a good way to reduce sound transmitted through the material. For a good example, look at the vinyl sound deadening liners used in the automotive industry. In fact, you could try applying these to the inside of this product. They are much thinner than acoustic panels, albeit heavier. One popular aftermarket brand name is Dynamat.

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