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I have many M2 flush-mount, counter-sunk hex screws ordered from a variety of sources, including McMaster Carr, Ebay, etc. The Wiha 263 1.5x50 screwdriver I have does not drive any of these properly, which means I have to step down to a 1.3mm screwdriver which is too loose and causes stripping.

Can someone help me identify the proper screwdriver to drive M2 Hex screws? Numerous google searches don't seem to shed any light on this, although pages like this seem to suggest a 1.5mm hex driver SHOULD fit.

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    $\begingroup$ This page prescribes 1.3mm . $\endgroup$ – Nick Alexeev Mar 6 '17 at 5:37
  • $\begingroup$ Low profile variants use smaller drivers because there is less material to provide mechanical strength. The manufacturer's datasheet is law in this regard. If you get screws from ebay then it's anyone's guess. $\endgroup$ – user6335 Jan 30 '18 at 21:20
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A couple pages , csgnetwork and ruland specify 1.5 mm. Perhaps your Wiha is a bad unit, or perhaps you would be happier with a ball-end driver which is much easier to insert. At these sizes, it only takes a little bit of edge roughness to cause great difficulty inserting a flat-end driver.

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  • $\begingroup$ I sanded it down to 1.45mm and it still doesn't work. Maybe the other commenter was right that it should be 1.3mm. That doesn't explain why 1.3mm feels overly loose but maybe that is just what to expect? $\endgroup$ – Jeremy Gilbert Mar 7 '17 at 3:13
  • $\begingroup$ I find ball ends difficult on small dimensions, as the recession is often not deep enough to get a good grip on the ball... $\endgroup$ – vidarlo Nov 1 '17 at 19:49
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    $\begingroup$ @vidarlo, I concur, ball ends are no good for M3 and smaller, they just chowder up the socket and cam-out easily. A careful technician can get away with it, but a 250-pound gorilla in the assembly department will be stripping heads and threads all day long. $\endgroup$ – user6335 Jan 30 '18 at 21:24
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1.5mm would be the expected value for M2 hex. This can, however, vary between manufacturers - there may be legitimate reasons for deviating from standards.

The best thing would of course be to ask the manufacturer what driver size they recommend. The second best thing is to get a measurement. 1.5mm can be measured using calipers, perhaps aided by a magnifying glass.

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.95mm would be what is used in the slot car industry for this

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Engineering! Please edit your answer to flesh it out. For inspiration, read this discussion on short answers (in the context of comments, but much of what is discussed applies to very short answers such as this one). $\endgroup$ – Wasabi Apr 14 '20 at 12:51

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