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Hi I am trying to make a CAD model of something like the scoop sampler shown below.

http://www.rolls-royce.com/~/media/Files/R/Rolls-Royce/documents/customers/nuclear/scoop-sampling-tcm92-50918.pdf

This is for a university coursework that requires design of bespoke machines. I am trying to design a machine that can literally scoop out a 1 mm thick sample from any aerospace component. My intention is to use a motor to rotate the shaft which is connected to the cutter (with abrasive particles to cut through metal).

enter image description here See this would initiate the cutting and only cut at the controlled depth (based on the dimension of the cutter) but how can I possibly make the cutter to eventually go up? (lets say after 35 - 40mm length I want the cutter to make a vertical movement so that it scoops out). To clarify I want the final metal scoop to be roughly 40mm long, 20mm wide and max thickness of 1mm. So once it reaches around 35mm how can I make it go up vertically while the shaft and cutter is rotating in the horizontal axis?

Finally what if I don't have a flat surface. Imagine if I have a concave surface. I have some ideas but I can't seem to get through these initial problems.

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  1. I would move the cutter closer to the motor.
  2. Design the shaft so that it passes through the motor and through the cutter so that you have some length of shaft extending out both ends. Then, you can attach some type of arm that can lift the cutter assembly. Maybe some type of lever, or something more complicated like a power screw that can be controlled to move the cutter + motor vertically.
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A suggestion: if the shaft has a reduced diameter section on the end, and that section is cut eccentrically to the scoop's axis of rotation, then the scoop will lift up and down as it rotates.

NB abrasive particles each cut their own little sample, so I think you might need to look for another idea.

Also, the size of cut-out piece you mention is pretty big in "cutting metal" terms. That means high forces. You'll need to find some way to anchor the machine... especially if you're going to sample a turbine blade.

Hopefully it's just the mechanism you need. All the best

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