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With folding barriers like the one below, how does the orange bar get turned by the green mechanism? What's inside the yellow triangular part?

enter image description here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LF8kSTCZIxw

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What you see here is two sets of four-bar linkages connected to each other to form a six-bar linkage. To be more precise this is a Watt type 1 six-bar linkage. This particular configuration is known for its ability to fold together by rotating only one member.

enter image description here

Image 1: The classification of some planar 6 bar linkages

There is nothing inside the yellow part although in parallel to that there is a straight linkage bar. The way you analyze these is just draw a simplified image contain just joints and apparent connections.

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Think of the orange bar as the humerus bone in your upper arm, the blue bar as your radius, and the pink one as your ulna. The gate folds up in much the same way your arm folds up, and opens up much the same too.

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    $\begingroup$ A diagram would be useful, since presumably anyone who knows how the arm bones link together already knows the answer to the OP. $\endgroup$ Feb 14 '17 at 14:45
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Since the pink linkage sits above the blue arm in the post, it has no problem reaching up to the trangular part when blue arm is raised. When blue arm is lowered, the pink linkage doesn't reach as far up the blue arm and starts to pull back on the triangular part, erecting the orange arm

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