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If the material is manufactured by 3D printing (laser sintering) then what will be change in its mechanical properties than the properties by casting and machined part? What would be appropriate failure criteria for it?

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    $\begingroup$ 3D printed materials are typically quite anisotropic. In-layer they have similar properties to cast/extruded/molded materials. Across layer, it depends nearly entirely on the build environment. I don't think the properties are well characterized yet so typically the best option is print something and test it. $\endgroup$ – ericksonla Feb 8 '17 at 4:12
  • $\begingroup$ ok thnaks @ericksonla . But the properties in the additive plane will be same or different as the layer is added on it then the 2nd layer above it. $\endgroup$ – mPm Feb 8 '17 at 8:10
  • $\begingroup$ That is an excellent question. A colleague gave an informal, in-class presentation on the subject of laser and electron-beam additive manufacturing, and some of the cited articles showed a difference in composition and properties at different heights in the layering direction, due to retention of heat by the metal being sintered. In short, it isn't obvious that the top face of a laser sintered part should behave the same way as the bottom face. $\endgroup$ – wwarriner Feb 9 '17 at 17:12
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This depends on the alloy type (and specific alloy) and the quality of the material after it's been produced which can change depending on the manufacturing parameters.

The strengths of additive manufactured material are often better than cast when it's done properly, but I have yet to see any that are better than forged/rolled material. I have seen material with large amounts of porosity which had properties considerable worse than cast.

The failure Criteria also depends on the application, e.g. voids in SLM material can act as initiation points for fatigue failures greatly decrease the fatigue life of a material with good strength properties. Unfortunately the only way to definitively determine the properties for a material (suitable for structural designs) is to test it.

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