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Please forgive me if this isn't the right place for this question but I'm trying to understand the difference between AT (Automatic Transmission) and AMT (Automated Manual Transmission) as far as the driving experience is concerned.
Is there any difference and if yes, what are these differences ?

For example, if you trying move forward in a MT (Manual Transmission) car, when the car is parked uphill, then you will need to use half-clutch to prevent it from rolling backwards. I've heard that such a problem doesn't exist in an AT but I have no idea about AMT. This is just one aspect of the driving experience I'm trying to learn about.

If there's any aspect where they do differ, please include them in your answer. I'm not interested in the mechanical differences though.

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  • $\begingroup$ this is really a broad question calling for opinions. There are many types of manually shiftable ajtomatics. Probably fair to say any amt would be suitable for those too lazy to learn to drive a stick. $\endgroup$ – agentp Dec 11 '16 at 14:56
  • $\begingroup$ @agentp " too lazy to learn to drive a stick" - This is very country-dependent. For example in the UK, almost everybody learns to drive in a MT car, unless they have a physical disability and can't operate a MT. Passing the driving test in MT car automatically permits you to drive AT, but the opposite is not true. On the other hand, the USA is rather different - or at least it was different before the American public started buying more than half its cars from Japan and European manufacturers. $\endgroup$ – alephzero Dec 12 '16 at 8:23
  • $\begingroup$ the point is , broadly stated, its not an engineering question. You can go on any automotive forum you like and read endless debates on the topic. $\endgroup$ – agentp Dec 12 '16 at 12:41
  • $\begingroup$ Good luck even finding a car with a manual transmission here in the USA. $\endgroup$ – DLS3141 Mar 8 '17 at 18:38
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With manual transmissions every time the gears are changed, while the vehicle is in motion, the driver must engage and disengaged the clutch.

With automatic transmissions the car automatically changes gears, when a vehicle is in motion, based on the torque requirements while the vehicle is moving.

Automated manual transmission (also known as semi automatic transmissions, clutchless manual transmission & flappy paddle gear shift) allow gears to be changed without the driver activating the clutch. This is achieved using sensors, actuators, pneumatics to change the gears; making the clutch pedal redundant because the clutch is activated by electronic equipment.

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Well speeds. In a manual car you can go from 2 to 5 and keep performing, were as in a automatic you need to follow the numbers.

And not all manual cars can jump gears some cars stops when you skip gears.

In a manual cause you can accelerate and you'll be at the top of the hill safe. Half clutch is for people who want to go uphill relaxed. In my neighborhood you won't find people driving slow when they go uphill. We all accelerate

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks @user12532 but this still doesn't answer my question, which is basically the difference between AT & AMT with respect to the driving experience. $\endgroup$ – Dhiwakar Ravikumar Dec 11 '16 at 12:00
  • $\begingroup$ Well in a AMT you don't have a clutch pedal and if you want you could but it in D mode and while driving all you'll have to worry about is going and stopping. $\endgroup$ – user12532 Dec 11 '16 at 12:10
  • $\begingroup$ AT you'll worry about changing gears and all. $\endgroup$ – user12532 Dec 11 '16 at 12:13
  • $\begingroup$ is it me or is all of this incoherent nonsense? $\endgroup$ – agentp Dec 11 '16 at 14:58
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AMT can cover a few different systems. Modern versions typically use a dual clutch system which pre-selects the next gear. The actual driving experience will depend on the control system and it's not uncommon to have selectable modes which work in concert with engine mapping, traction control, stability control ABS etc.

In many cases they will still have a manual clutch, either as a hand paddle or foot pedal and may also have a neutral button as well as an automated anti-stall system. The clutch is not required for normal gear changes but may be used for pulling away from a standstill. Equally AMTs can emulate traditional type automatic transmissions and just use throttle and brake with no driver input to gear change or clutch operation at all.

As an aside, there is quite a lot of technical information on this subject in the context of F1 gear boxes. Until recently F1 cars had a dual paddle clutch system with one paddle used to blend in the clutch from a preset bite point and one which was more of an on/off switch with respect to the initial preset bite point. The idea being to improve reaction time to the start lights as the first one is was released immediately in reaction to the lights and the second was released gradually to give fine control of torque delivery.

So in summary a modern semi-automatic gearbox has quite a lot of potential parameters available which can be adjusted to affect the driving experience which is determined by a combination of user settings and the software which controls the whole system. So in a sophisticated version you might have settings on a spectrum between convenience and ease of driving and maximum performance with a range of settings in between as well as modes for specific conditions and to maximise fuel economy.

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