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How can water be removed from a submarine that is submerged?

If a submarine is opened, while it is submerged, water would get in because of the difference between the pressures.

For example, I have seen that there is a diving room in submarines, these rooms are in direct contact with the sea but the level of the water remains steady.

Can anyone explain for me this phenomenon?

If just the water level was steady, why don't we threw the water directly to the sea?

explanation

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    $\begingroup$ What about pumps? I'm sure they operate the flow with different pumps. That's what you normally do with you have to overcome a pressure and gravity is not on your side (I'm not expert in the field) $\endgroup$
    – Physther
    Nov 29, 2016 at 14:31
  • $\begingroup$ i made a change on the question, please i would like u to read it @Brian Drummond $\endgroup$ Nov 29, 2016 at 14:58
  • $\begingroup$ Is this of any help? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escape_trunk $\endgroup$
    – Physther
    Nov 29, 2016 at 15:19
  • $\begingroup$ thank you Paul :) , i think it talks about a separate room, it's like a second submarine, it has no direct contact with the water, what i ask about really is how can we have a stable surface of a direct contact with the sea water and a normal airy room $\endgroup$ Nov 29, 2016 at 15:29
  • $\begingroup$ So you mean like a hatch that is opened and you see the level of water when you are inside? Like an "ice-fishing" level where the ice would be the walls? $\endgroup$
    – Physther
    Nov 29, 2016 at 15:35

2 Answers 2

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No matter how you set it up, you'll need a two-door lock room. For example, torpedos are placed in the firing tube in air, the rear hatch is locked, and the tube is flooded. Only then is the torpedo launched.

Divers can and do exit submarines which have a similar lock room for people. The same basic sequence is performed -- and reversed when the divers return. Here's a great photo Seal entry to sub

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  • $\begingroup$ you could have an open pool if you maintained the air pressure high enough. Obviously only practical at extremely shallow depths.. $\endgroup$
    – agentp
    Nov 30, 2016 at 2:42
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The picture that you have drawn is not of submarine but a diving bell (check up wikipedia). In a diving bell the pressure inside the chamber balances the hydrostatic pressure of water and hence the water level inside the diving bell does not rise. You have see this if you push a glass tumbler into a tub.

In a true submarine, the water in the balast tanks is vented by pushing in compressed air from reservoirs. However this is not the only way submarines can control their depth.

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