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Will Hyper loop succeed as a means of human transportation? What would be the adverse effect on the human body travelling at 1000km/h?

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    $\begingroup$ you are traveling faster than that right now $\endgroup$
    – agentp
    Nov 16 '16 at 2:17
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    $\begingroup$ 1000 km/h relative to what? If you are at the equator, you are already traveling at more than 1000 km/h relative to the center of the earth. $\endgroup$
    – alephzero
    Nov 16 '16 at 2:22
  • $\begingroup$ But there is no distance from point A to B because I didn't get anywhere sitting still for more than1 hour at the office. $\endgroup$
    – Marvz
    Nov 16 '16 at 7:37
  • $\begingroup$ I just remembered a James Bond movie, where he traveled using an abandoned oil pipe... was the hyper loop technology based on the movie? Does anyone know the title of the movie? $\endgroup$
    – Marvz
    Nov 16 '16 at 7:44
  • $\begingroup$ @marvz There is a distance from point A to point B depending on how you define things. Relative to the surface of earth, you don't notice the rotation. But compared to say the sun, you've moved quite a bit, even there was no change relative to anything on the surface. $\endgroup$
    – JMac
    Nov 16 '16 at 10:53
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No impact at all as long as you don't open the window. The effect of ~500 mph wind (~800km/h) on someones face can be seen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IU4SDDNXuUA .

Someone in the space station will be going a lot faster than that (about 27,600km/h) and they have a nice smooth ride (and even bigger problems if someone opened a window). The rough bits are getting there and back, they have to accelerate up to those speeds and then slow down again.

If you assume that the air the person is breathing is moving with the person then speed isn't an issue but acceleration is.

The acceleration to get to 1000 km/h and slow down again could have an impact but it only needs 1g for 30 seconds. 1g sitting down and sitting facing forward isn't excessive. Slowing down would have to take longer unless you somehow rotated the seats so that you faced backwards for the braking. It's one thing to be pushed back into a chair, it's another to be thrown forward.

The other big issue is bumps or corners in the track. At those speeds it doesn't take much of a bump to result in large accelerations, similarly any corner will have to have a massive turning circle to avoid excessive lateral forces. You need a very smooth track to avoid it feeling like the worlds largest rollercoaster.

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Acceleration has an effect on bodies in classical mechanics, but not the speed itself. Nevertheless, for friction to the air should be considered. I hope you do not have to consider friction to the ground.

The human has (almost) no movement in the vehicule.

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Not in my opinion, due to more design cons. Effect due to speed is no adverse effect, but in Hyperloop at least we may have acceleration (G-force) which have adverse effect to body.

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  • $\begingroup$ Have they revealed how they will stop when it reaches the terminal? Will it be deceleration or a special brake? Did it push thru this November 8? $\endgroup$
    – Marvz
    Nov 16 '16 at 7:39

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