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How is such a one piece car chassis from carbon fiber made at one piece?

Do they make the parts individually and bond it some way that it is extremely durable bond?

What bonds are really durable for carbon fiber that they can allow for carbon fiber to behave in stress tests as one piece?

Since carbon fiber needs to be vacuumed to be cured, doing this one piece has some challenges how can this even be possibly made one piece?

NOTE: Any book or resources on this topic would be greatly appreciated it

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First off, think about good old-fashioned injection molds or even lost-wax molds. It's relatively easy to cast complicated single-piece objects.

In the case of carbon-fiber fab, it depends a bit on what you call "one piece." Usually the structure is built up out of intricately cut 'fabric' which is coated with bonding fluids to produce an integral single structure.

There's some pretty decent explanations of one process here . It appears that if you have a good mold, you can place the fabric however you like & cure it in place.

You may enjoy this BMW video on their processes.

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  • $\begingroup$ +1. Just wanted to comment on the one part thing. It is quite metaphysical. Is a structure welded together one part? And by whoom? What about if we switch over to 3D printing, is each layer a separate part? What about a coffe mug is the handle separate? Again depends on who looks at the problem. $\endgroup$ – joojaa Oct 7 '16 at 4:38
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One approach is to manufacture a core from materials such as rigid foam, expanded metal (aluminium honeycomb etc) other similar low density but rigid materials along with any inserts and attachment points and then cover the whole thing with the appropriate pre-preg cloth.

This can then be wrapped in plastic film to seal it and then vacuumed and cured in an autoclave.

Laying up over a core may not give quite as smooth a surface finish as laying up in a machined mould but allows for much more complex shapes, and it is entirely possible to use polished moulds on some surfaces but not all.

In the example image in the question not that while the exterior surfaces such as the roof are smooth a lot of the interior surfaces have noticeable texture.

you can see this in the following video :

https://youtu.be/u4BrWI5Xi0g

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