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I recently read about a newly proposed 'burger' lane across a roundabout.

burger lane

From what I can see, it bypasses the main point of a roundabout, a continuous circle of traffic with well defined rights of way. The only reason I can imagine one is to stop a tributary to the roundabout clogging the other entrances,but I don't understand how that would be achieved.

What's the purpose of a 'burger' lane in a roundabout?

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  • $\begingroup$ it's to make the roundabout center look like a hamburger, of course. $\endgroup$ Mar 1, 2022 at 4:05

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There are several of these near where I live (in the UK) but I've never heard the term "burger lanes" before. We don't seem to have a name for them - they just are!

They serve the same basic function as a roundabout with a flyover bridge, except that all the roads are on the same level. The intersections of the burger lane and the roundabout are controlled by traffic lights.

They have an advantage where the main traffic flow is different at different times of day (e.g. during the commuting rush hours) - for example traffic can move faster across the "burger lane" than negotiating the sharper curves entering and leaving the roundabout itself, if the roundabout is relatively small and there is no space available to enlarge it.

For example here's one on Google Maps where there is a "burger lane" on the north-east bound carriage way of the dual-carriageway A52 (to avoid driving round most of the roundabout) but not on the south-west bound carriageway, which only passes one intersection on the roundabout - and that road, "Town St," has a negligible amount of traffic compared with the A6007 "Ilkeston road" on the other side.

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.9359805,-1.2496093,332m/data=!3m1!1e3

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Another purpose of such a lane is to allow for vehicles that cannot navigate the roundabout to travel through.

For example a tram's turning radius may not allow them to drive around the roundabout so they instead cut through them.

Another class of vehicles is oversized cargo transport along the designated routes for that class of transport. Which is why you can sometime see roundabouts with a hardened burger lane but closed of to normal traffic.

An example from google streetview: enter image description here

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Big vehicles like trucks are often given a priority in these so called lanes so they don't risk flipping. It's also emergency vehicles bypass so they don't have to go around in an emergency. Emergency vehicles zoom past traffic and In america the vehicles like Ambulances and fire engines are often big and have high centers of gravity. Being fast in a straight line helps avoid rollovers. By contrast, European Ambulance enter image description here Vs. American Counterpart enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ So burger (lanes) prevent the risk of flipping? But what about them works better in these cases? $\endgroup$ Feb 27, 2022 at 10:44

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