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I have an electrical connector made of zinc-aluminum alloy (exact mixture unknown) that I would like to braze to a steel tube. Can this be done, what kind of material(s) would work for this application?

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  • $\begingroup$ The zinc-aluminum is almost certainly a thin coating on top of the underlying steel, and any sort of brazing operation will destroy it and its protective qualities. Perhaps you would be better off epoxying it into place. $\endgroup$ – Dave Tweed Sep 16 '16 at 13:44
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    $\begingroup$ Hi Dave, the connector itself is solid zinc-aluminum, the steel rod I want to join this to is solid steel. There are no coated elements. $\endgroup$ – William Hird Sep 16 '16 at 19:18
  • $\begingroup$ Are you familiar with Triclad $\endgroup$ – Phil Sweet Oct 13 '17 at 0:12
  • $\begingroup$ Hi Phil, thank you for the info, but I dropped this project, I joined the pieces with a custom made coupling . $\endgroup$ – William Hird Oct 14 '17 at 16:38
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Zinc/aluminium alloys are not uncommon in die cast parts and it should be possible to braze/solder. You would need a filler rod designed for 'white metal' or 'multi-metal' filler and the appropriate flux.

Having said that brazing/soldering unusual materials is often a bit tricky as you need to judge the temperature of both parts within a fairly narrow window with little in the way of visual clues and the low melting point of zinc means they you have to be very gentle with the heat.

Personally I would look at a mechanical connector as the first choice for something like this, even if it involves brazing or welding an intermediate bracket, stud etc to the steel.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi Chris, your idea rings true, I might have to do an intermediate linkage. $\endgroup$ – William Hird Sep 16 '16 at 19:20
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Mechanical connection is the first choice. I would have said brazing is too hot for any aluminum alloy , but checking a reference I was surprised. There is a loop hole; somehow, using aluminum /silicon fillers ( no copper) can still be caused "brazing". However the steel must be coated with aluminum or copper first. So , mechanical or solder are the main options.

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